Folio

Artist Spotlight: Rui Ricardo

Rui Ricardo draws on manga influences to create his highly polished illustrations. He often combines cartoon-like exaggerations with magical realism, a technique that his given his artistry an international appeal.

He began honing his skills early on and was first published at the age of fifteen. Ricardo’s love for illustration and comics carried him to university in Porto, Portugal, where he now lives and works.

Ricardo’s illustrious resume includes animation and motion design work for several TV shows, music videos and commercials, as well as editorial work for FHM, Men’s Fitness, The Times, The Telegraph, The Mail on Sunday, GQ, Popular Mechanics, The Guardian, Marketing Week, and many more.

You can see more of Rui Ricardo’s work on his Directory of Illustration portfolio or on his website.

 

 

 

 

Peter Greenwood for TIME Magazine

Peter Greenwood created illustrations that were featured in the April edition of TIME. For the artwork, he was tasked with representing the deficient bridges, tunnels, airports, and roads across America and Peter employed an overhead composition to map out the issues.

Peter is represented by Folio Art. Check out more of his fun illustrations through his Directory of Illustration portfolio or through folioart.co.uk.

©Peter Greenwood

©Peter Greenwood

©Peter Greenwood

©Peter Greenwood

Owen Davey: The Life & TImes of Albus Dumbledore

Owen Davey‘s new illustration for Pottermore examines the life of Albus Dumbledore, portraying the significant moments that shaped the life of one of the most influential wizards of his time.

Get the full experience here.

Owen is represented by Folio Art. View more of his work through his Directory of Illustration portfolio, or at folioart.co.uk.

©Owen Davey

©Owen Davey

©Owen Davey

©Owen Davey

©Owen Davey

Illustrated Maps That Captivate & Inform

Featured image: ©Carlo Stanga

Illustrated maps use artistic style to create an accurate representation of an area while emphasizing what’s important and eye-catching.

In this way, illustrated maps give us the ability to virtually travel across the globe and visit places we’ve never been. They also serve to help us navigate our world and help us discover new, exciting things in our own familiar surroundings.

Here are a few examples of informative & captivating maps by Directory of Illustration artists.

Explore more illustration specialties, techniques & subjects through our keyword search.

Bodil Jane for UNICEF

In an attempt to draw attention to the substantial impact of air pollution, UNICEF took to social media to share works that illustrate the harmful effects of pollution on today’s children.

This illustration by Bodil Jane, a talented Folio artist, was among the selected works for the project and was featured on the UNICEF Instagram & Twitter page, Medium.com and the It’s Nice That website.

Read more about her approach the project here.

Browse through Bodil’s work through her Directory of Illustration portfolio & folioart.co.uk.

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Folio Celebrates Its 40th Anniversary

Featured image: ‘Wired for Sound’ by Syd Brak

Since its establishment over four decades ago, Folio has managed to withstand the test of time. The art agency, based in central London, was founded by Nicholas Dawe in the pre-digital era when few illustration agencies existed. Though it has certainly evolved since the earlier days, Folio still consistently selects artists that implement unique techniques and create some of the most distinctive images in the industry.  Their diverse group of talented commercial artists continues to produce work for high caliber ad agencies & publishers all over the world.

For Folio’s 40th anniversary, we were honored to speak to Nicholas Dawe about the origin of the agency, what has kept them going strong for 40 years, and what’s in the future for Folio.

Nick in an AOI newsletter from '77

Nick in an AOI newsletter from ’77

What was the catalyst that caused you to want to open an illustration agency?

I became an illustration agent when I started working for Andy Archer in 1971. Andy had previously sold space in Queen Magazine to ad agencies – he was good at sales and had ad agency contacts – and so had set himself up as an agent. Andy taught me how to hustle on behalf of the artists. I had been introduced to Andy by his good friend, the artist George Underwood, who Andy represented. I was always fascinated when watching George draw and paint works such as the early Marc Bolan album covers and was happy to get to know other talented artists as an agent.

With five years of experience under my belt, I struck out on my own and founded Folio on October 26, 1976. There were still just a handful of agencies in the UK at the time and Folio is the only one that continues in its original form, run by its founder.

Painting by George Underwood for David Bowie's Hunky Dory Album on Harper's Baazar November cover

Painting by George Underwood for David Bowie’s Hunky Dory Album on the Harper’s Bazaar November cover

Folio has remained in the same location since it first began. Can you give us a little history about the studio/office space?

After a year in a basement shop in Edgeware, in 1977 we moved to Lincoln’s Inn Fields, where the studio office was furnished with plan chest drawers, transparency holders and state-of-the-art lighting and ample flat surfaces – not to mention, of course, a bar.

Every Friday, art buyers and artists from across the country would come together at Folio studios to socialize and check out the latest artworks. For a period, several artists were based at Folio and would habitually work through the night to meet deadlines – the office became known locally as ‘the lighthouse’.

The Folio studio office

The Folio studio office

Very few artist agencies existed when you started Folio. Did you find the art commissioners to be receptive to working through an agent?

Art commissioners were very receptive to dealing with an agent because they knew that the agent had knowledge of a number of artists and connections with those resources. This was before the internet so it wasn’t so easy for commissioners to research different artists and styles – they were happy to rely on an agent to guide them.

What challenges did you face in the early days?

In a pre-digital time, all work was physical. The artists worked on paper, artboard or canvas.  If you called an artist, such as Paul Hogarth, and they were in the middle of a watercolor wash, they couldn’t be interrupted. In order for clients to see the work, it had to be couriered to them, whether they were in London, elsewhere in the UK or overseas. Amendments were a huge effort; if they were required, not only did the artist need to find a way to redraw the artwork but the physical object also needed to be couriered back to the artist – and then the process began again. Oil paintings took five days to dry, but deadlines were tight so they would be packed in deep frames for shipping while the paint was still wet. I spent many a night waiting on train platforms for the Red Star Express to arrive with a painting. Twice, works fell onto the tracks and were run over by trains, and one internationally couriered artwork even arrived with an aircraft tire print running across it!

Illustration by Owen Davey

Illustration by Owen Davey

What has kept you in the business?

What has kept Folio in the business is the love of seeing the artworks created. I have worked with Royal Academicians and D&AD Black Pencil award winners, trendsetters, and innovators. In my pre-Folio days working for Andy Archer, I even worked with Salvador Dalí – not an easy artist to commission!

If you could go back in time to 40 years ago, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Get out after 20!

MUTI's 'Voyages Extraordinaire', Self-initiated category winner in 2015 AOI Illustration Awards

MUTI‘s ‘Voyages Extraordinaire’, Self-initiated category winner in 2015 AOI Illustration Awards

What excites you about current trends in illustration?

Increasingly it is when art and technology are pushing each other to new developments in each field.

What’s ahead for Folio?

The longevity of Folio comes down to its willingness to refresh itself with new talent, even from its early days – new artists are taken on all the time, bringing novel techniques, new ideas, and fresh eyes. Folio has always prided itself on working with originators: ‘often imitated, never duplicated’. The agency will continue to evolve, as it has always done, and I look forward to more and more exciting jobs worldwide.

Artist Spotlight: Megapont

Megapont is a group made up of Russian pixel artists Dmitry and Yuriy. Heavily influenced by early computer art, retro 2D computer games and their Russian heritage, the duo creates sprawling, detailed metropolises and scenes of pop culture mayhem that defy belief.

Megapont is represented by Folio Art. View more of their work through of Directory of Illustration portfolio and at folioart.co.uk.

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

©Megapont

MUTI: Ster Kinekor Cinemas

MUTI collaborated with FoxP2 Cape Town to create a series of wallpapers, portraying iconic movie moments with a twist towards the movie-going experience, for the foyers of Ster Kinekor Cinemas.

MUTI is represented by Folio Art. Check out more of their work through their Directory of Illustration portfolio or at folioart.co.uk.

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI

©MUTI